Weill Cornell Medicine Samuel J. Wood Library

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We Heard the Call: Base Hospital No 9

In 1916, the American Red Cross prepared for US possible involvement in the war by organizing base hospitals.  The Red Cross identified several major medical centers or hospitals to organize these units.  The idea was that the doctors and nurses would already work well together.  Each medical center or hospital supplied the personnel, equipment, and supplies for their unit. Twenty two doctors, 2 dentists, 65 Red Cross nurses, 22 nurses’ aides, 153 enlisted men, 6 civilians, and chaplain staffed each base hospital for a two-year service.

We Heard the Call: Our Doctors and Nurses in World War I: Base Hospital No 9

In 1916, the American Red Cross prepared for US possible involvement in the war by organizing base hospitals.  The Red Cross identified several major medical centers or hospitals to organize these units.  The idea was that the doctors and nurses would already work well together.  Each medical center or hospital supplied the personnel, equipment, and supplies for their unit. Twenty two doctors, 2 dentists, 65 Red Cross nurses, 22 nurses’ aides, 153 enlisted men, 6 civilians, and chaplain staffed each base hospital for a two-year service.

We Heard the Call: American Ambulance Hospital

Several of our doctors and nurses served with the American Ambulance Hospital in Neuilly a suburb of Paris.  Americans in France who wanted access to medical care by American trained doctors formed the American Hospital of Paris in 1904.  In 1914, the hospital established the American Ambulance Hospital at the Lycee Pasteur School building in Neuilly, France.  They were the first foreign ambulance to be accepted by the French government to serve French soldiers in the war.  The hospital operated from 1914-1917. 

We Heard the Call: Robert Schrock, MD Papers

The archives has received a small collection of World War I letters by Robert Schrock, MD who served with Base Hospital No 9.  Dr. Schrock graduated from Cornell University Medical College in 1912.  After graduatation he continued his training at The New York Hospital where he decided to pursue a practice in orthopedic surgery.  When US entered the war in 1917, he was practicing in Omaha, NE.

We Heard the Call: Our Doctors and Nurses in World War I: 1300 York Avenue Lobby Exhibit

We Heard the Call: Our Doctors and Nurses in World War I exhibit celebrates the 100th anniversary of our doctors and nurses affiliated with The New York Hospital, Cornell University Medical College, and New York Hospital Training School for Nurses service in World War I.  417 (260 were CUMC alumni) doctors, 201 nurses, and 29 Bloomingdale Hospital employees answered the call to serve in the war.

New York Hospital and the Civil War

At the dawn of the Civil War, New York Hospital was located at its first site on Broadway between Duane and Worth Streets. From April 1861-February 1862, New York Hospital had an agreement with the New York State Militia to accept sick or wounded officers and privates. From February 1862 until the end of the war, the hospital had an agreement with the U. S. Medical Department to accept non-commissioned officers and privates from the Union Army.